Title: Roasted Thai Chilies

Original Page from webwonks.org

Ingredients

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Open a quart sized bag of dried Thai chilies and pour onto a cookie sheet. When the oven is hot put the chilies in for 8 minutes. Take them out and turn them after about 4 minutes. They are done when they change color from red to brick-red or darker. It is perfectly OK if some of them get a little blackened looking. You cooking time will vary depending on your stove, the humidity in the air and how dry your chilies are so the time is just an estimate. You go by the color not by the time.
Let them cool in a dry location and toss them into a blender a handful at a time. Run it on medium high until it looks like coarse red powder with seeds. Dump the chili powder into a mesh screen and shake the powder through it into a bowl. Dump the remaining seed and chunks of chili back into the blender and bust it up some more. Continue straining and blending until you start getting too many seed particles in the chili powder. Throw the seeds and remaining chunks away and pour the chili powder into a Tupperware container of an empty margarine tub. Something with a lid on it. You do not need to refrigerate it. You do not want to break the seeds up so be careful. The seeds do not have any hot, they are only hot from where they touched the placenta of the chili, the placenta is where all the hot in a chili is, seeds aren't hot at all. Seed = not hot. Chili 101.
If you prefer, you can stop when the chilies are in ground down to small flakes. Or you can do what I do now: partial coarse powder, partial small flakes, keep the seeds. I don't mind the seeds and all the Thai restaurants I go to keep the seeds in the ground powder. The important thing for me is to make the powder/flakes a size that you can measure accurately or at least consistently for recipes.
A quart Ziploc bag of Thai chilies grind down to a volume that will just fit in one of those Imperial Margarine soft butter tubs, about 1 1/4 cups worth.
This is some really great stuff, I put it on just about everything and it is an ingredient in almost every Thai recipe. Try it out on pizza, you will never go back to that crap Dominoes gives you. Thai chilies are the most delicious of all the chilies. When you roast them they smell like a chocolate cake baking, REALLY! They are much hotter than jalapenos or serranos or chili arbols. A word of warning when working with hot chilies... wash your hands afterwards or wear rubber gloves. We can argue all day about this but the first time you don't do that and rub your eye or take a leak... I win the argument. My first bad experience with this was when I was making up a batch of Gary's Salsa Godzilla a long long time ago in a kitchen far far away. I was chopping up the fresh chilies by hand and later that night I removed my contact lenses. It felt like boiling radioactive battery acid was shot into my eye from a high power black powder blunderbuss that was also loaded with rusty nails and festering dog snot. Man that really hurt. And I still had one lens left to remove so I wound up taking it out with a rubber glove on my hand. That one lens was still hot for several days. I wound up running it through the cleaning cycle a half dozen times. Do a taste test on your finger before jamming it into your eye. If it is hot in your mouth it is way hot in your eye. The same could go, I suppose, for reactor core uranium fuel rods. Do a taste test, if it makes your gums bleed, don't thrust it in your eye. This is common sense to me but to some people you have to spell every thing out.

Notes

Author Note: This is some really great stuff, I put it on just about everything and it is an ingredient in almost every Thai recipe. Try it out on pizza, you will never go back to that crap Dominoes gives you. Thai chilies are the most delicious of all the chilies. When you roast them they smell like a chocolate cake baking, REALLY! They are much hotter than jalapenos or serranos or chili arbols. A word of warning when working with hot chilies... wash your hands afterwards or wear rubber gloves. We can argue all day about this but the first time you don't do that and rub your eye or take a leak... I win the argument. My first bad experience with this was when I was making up a batch of Gary's Salsa Godzilla a long long time ago in a kitchen far far away. I was chopping up the fresh chilies by hand and later that night I removed my contact lenses. It felt like boiling radioactive battery acid was shot into my eye from a high power black powder blunderbuss that was also loaded with rusty nails and festering dog snot. Man that really hurt. And I still had one lens left to remove so I wound up taking it out with a rubber glove on my hand. That one lens was still hot for several days. I wound up running it through the cleaning cycle a half dozen times. Do a taste test on your finger before jamming it into your eye. If it is hot in your mouth it is way hot in your eye. The same could go, I suppose, for reactor core uranium fuel rods. Do a taste test, if it makes your gums bleed, don't thrust it in your eye. This is common sense to me but to some people you have to spell every thing out.

The original source:
http://webwonks.org/Hobbies/Peppers/Recipes.html#RoastedThaiChilies